Length 60 min

Choreography, lights, set Martin Harriague

Costumes Mieke Kockelkorn

 

Music P.I. Tchaikovski

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Assistant Nadav Gal
 

Performers Kibbutz Contemporary Dance Company

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Premiere Suzanne Dellal Tel Aviv Israel - 5.06.2016

                

Production Kibbutz Contemporary Dance Company

Presentation

PITCH, the acronym of Piotr Illitch Tchaikovsky, is a declaration of love to the man from whom the piece borrows more than his mere initials. In a personal and modern transcription, the choreographer lets the Russian composer’s music exert its thrall on him the better to celebrate its vitality, its depth and astonishing diversity. Informed by Nina Berberova’s biography and the correspondence published by André Lischke, the piece chronicles with both humour and emotion the life and world of Tchaikovsky in a mix of revisited classical variations and moments of eerie beauty. It reveals the tormented, frantic and sentimental soul of the artist torn between lust for life and morbid despair. Music begets movement: extracts from operas, symphonies, great classical ballets and piano scores augmented by the choreographer’s own electro- acoustic compositions all combine to depict various worlds alternately delicate and flamboyant, enchanted and pathetic of which the dancers are the instruments. Each one of them is a multiple being encapsulating the fantasized figures of the ballet characters, the sinuous life of the musician and the mayhem of our times. The outlandish costumes emphasize the blurred line between such an ethereal fantasy world and a totally real and often cruel one which the composer once had to deal with as does the choreographer today. And indeed, their creations both show how hard it is to appear as one is when under the harsh scrutiny of others. Compared to those found in classical ballets, the swan or prince figures on offer in the piece have lost much of their panache. They are characters more conform to reality, less dainty yet more jubilant as they embrace the pace, colours and vitality of the score. Yet the true hero in Pitch, the actual prince also beset by doubts and mockery, is none other than the musician himself.

Copyright © Martin Harriague. All rights reserved